Welsh Celtic Gods

Afallach
God. Associated with the afterlife, the isle of Avalon.

Amaethon
God. Likely associated with agriculture.

Arawn
God. Lord of the dead; associated with fertility.

Arianhrod
Goddess. Known as “Arianhrod of the Silver Wheel.” Mother of Dylan and Lleu.

Beli Mawr
Goddess. Father of the gods and perhaps the tribe, possibly associated with the land of the dead.

Blodeuwedd
Goddess. Bride of Lleu Llaw Gyffes, created from flowers.

Bran
God. Son of Llyr. Associated with leadership.

Branwen
Goddess. Daughter of Llyr.

Cerridwen
Goddess. Sorceress. Associated with poetry, inspiration and transformation. First attested in the Tale of Taliesin, which may date to the 9th–12th century.

Creiddylad
Goddess. Beautiful daughter of Lludd.

Don
Goddess. Mother of many of Welsh deities including Arianhrod.

Dylan
God. Associated with the sea. Son of Arianhrod, brother of Lleu.

Gofannon
God. Associated with smithing.

Gwydion
God. Brother of Arianhrod, uncle of Lleu. Associated with magic.

Gwyn
God. Son of Nudd. Associated with the Wild Hunt, possibly a psychopomp deity.

Lleu
God. Called “Lleu Llaw Gyffes.” Son of Arianhrod. Associated with battle and magic.

Lludd
God. Son of Beli and Don, a ruler of Britain, called Lludd Llaw Eraint (of the silver hand).

Llyr
God. Possibly associated with the sea. Likely cognate with Ireland’s Lir.

Mabon
God. Called Mabon ap Modron. Associated with hunting.

Manawyddan
God. Associated with various tales and skills, likely related to the Irish Manannan.

Math
God. Associated with magic and kingship.

Mathonwy
Gender uncertain. Parent of Math.

Modron
Goddess. Mother of Mabon. Likely associated with motherhood and fertility.

Nimue
Goddess. Associated with lakes and springs.

Penarddun
Goddess. Wife of Llyr, mother of Manawyddan.

Rhiannon
Goddess. Associated with kingship and horses.