About the Gods

The Gaulish and Brythonic Celtic Gods

Abandinus
God. Possibly a protective deity, possibly associated with a river or spring.(Known in Britain, worship site near Godmanchester.)

Abelio
God. May be associated with the apple tree. (Known in Gaul, worship sites along the Garonne in southwest France.)

Abnoba
Goddess. Associated with the hunt and the wilderness.(Known in Gaul and Britain.)

Adsullata
Goddess. Possibly a river goddess. (Known in Gaul, worship site in Austria.)

The Alaisiagae
Goddesses. Associations uncertain. Beda and Boudihillia are possibly Celtic names while Fimmilena and Friagabis are more likely Germanic. (Known in Britain, worship site at Housesteads Fort near Hadrian’s Wall and possibly at Bitberg, Germany.)

Alator
God. Likely a protective tribal deity. (Known in Britain, worship site in Hertfordshire.)

Alauda
Goddess. Possibly associated with order and balance. (Known in Gaul and Britain, worship sites in France and Britain.)

Alaunus
God. Associated with healers and seers.(Known in Gaul, worship sites in modern-day Austria.)

Albiorix
God. Likely a god of the Gaulish Albici tribe. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in France and Italy.)

Alisanos
God. Possibly associated with stone, or the earth. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in modern-day France.)

Allitio
God. Possibly associated with crafting and/ or with the otherworld. (Known in Britain, worship site at Corbridge in England.)

Ambisagrus
God. Possibly a tribal deity. (Known in Gaul, worship site at Aquileia in Italy.)

Ancamna
Goddess. Possibly associated with healing springs or rivers. (Known in Gaul, worship sites at Trier and Mohn, Germany.)

Ancasta
Goddess. Possibly associated with the River Itchen.(Known in Britain, worship site near Southampton.)

Andarta
Goddess. Uncertain associations, possibly a warrior or bear goddess. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in southern France and Bern, Switzerland.)

Andraste
Goddess. Known as a goddess of Boudica’s Iceni tribe. Associated with warfare. (Known in Britain, worship sites near Norfolk.)

Arduinna
Goddess. Associated with the wilderness; images show her riding a boar. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in the Ardennes.)

Arnemetia
Goddess. Possibly associated with a grove and/ or a spring. (Known in Britain, worship site at Buxton, UK.)

Artio
Goddess. Associated with the bear. (Known in Gaul, worship sites near Bern, Switzerland and in parts of western Germany.)

Aveta
Goddess. Associated with motherhood. (Known in Gaul, worship sites near Trier, Germany.)

Belatucadros
God. Associated with battle.(Known in Britain, worship sites in northern England.)

Belenos
God. Associated with the sun and with healing. (Known in Gaul and Britain, worship sites across Europe.)

Belisama
Goddess. Associated with rivers and lakes; possibly associated with the sun and summer. (Known in Gaul and Britain, worship sites in Gaul and northern England.)

Bergusia
Goddess. Associated with abundance and/or metalwork. Consort of Ucuetis. (Known in Gaul, worship site in Alesia.)

Bibracte
Goddess. Eponymous goddess of a great Gaulish city. (Known in Gaul, worship site in what is now Autun in Burgundy, France.)

Bormana
Goddess. Likely associated with healing springs. Sometimes paired with Borvo. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in Drome and Ain in France.)

Borvo
God. A consort of Damona. Associated with healing. (Known in Gaul, worship sites primarily in northeastern France but spread elsewhere as well.)

Braciaca
Goddess. Possibly a patron of brewers. Some believe this deity to be male. (Known in Britain, worship site near Derby, England.)

Bricta
Goddess. Associated with healing. (Known in Gaul and Britain, worship sites at Luxeuil, France and Blackmoorgate, England.)

Brigantia
Goddess. A tribal deity; associated with healing and rivers. (Known in Britain.)

Britovius
God. Possibly a protective or warrior deity.(Known in Gaul, worship site at Nimes, France.)

Camulus
God. Associated with war and battle. (Known in Gaul and Britain, wany worship sites throughout Gaul.)

Carantana
Goddess. Possibly associated with wisdom; name refers to constancy.(Known in Gaul, worship site at Etrechy, France.)

Catubodua
Goddess. Possibly associated with battle. (Known in Gaul, worship site in Haute-Savoie, France.)

Caturix
God. Likely a battle god and tribal protector. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in the Swiss Alps.)

Celeus
God. Uncertain associations due to fragmentary evidence. (Known in Gaul, worship site in Pourrieres, France.)

Cernunnos
God. Associated with nature and commerce. (Known in Gaul, worship sites near Paris, France and likely a deity with widespread worship across the region.).

Cissonius
God. Protector of travelers. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in the region between France and Germany)

Cocidius
God. Associated with battle and hunting. (Known in Britain, worship sites near Hadrian’s Wall.)

Condatis
God. Battle god; associated with confluences of waterways. (Known in Britain and Gaul, worship sites in Brittany and Yorkshire.)

Contrebis
God. Perhaps associated with the home. (Known in Britain, worship sites in Cumbria and Lancaster.)

Coventina
Goddess. Associated with fresh-water springs and wells. (Known in Britain, worship sites near Northumberland.)

The Cucullati
Gods. Hooded figures (genii Cucullati) friendly to humanity. (Known in Britain and Gaul, worship sites mainly in Britain and north-central Gaul.)

Cuda
Goddess. Associated with prosperity and good health. (Known in Britain, worship site at Cirencester in the Cotswolds.)

Damona
Goddess. Sometimes paired with Borvo. Associated with healing springs and spas. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in eastern France.)

Danuvius
God. Associated with the Danube. (Known in Gaul, worship sites along the Danube.)

Divanno and Dinomogetimaros
Gods. Worshipped together. (Known in Gaul, worship site at St.-Pons-de-Thomieres, France.)

Divona
Goddess. Associated with the source of fresh water. (Known in Gaul, worship site at Cahors, France.)

Endovelicus
God. Associated with protection, healing and prophecy. (Known in Gaul, worship sites mainly in Portugal.)

Entarabus
God. Possibly a protective god. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany and France.)

Epona
Goddess. Associated with horses (and cavalry), fertility and abundance. (Known in Gaul, Germania and Britain, worship sites all over Europe, including Rome.)

Erecura
Goddess. Associated with fertility and the underworld. (Known in Gaul, wany worship sites in the Danube region.)

Esus
God. Depicted in art bearing an axe. Connected with Taranis and Teutates. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in Paris, France and Trier, Germany.)

Etiona
Goddess. Possibly associated with knowledge.(Known in Gaul, worship site at Etrechy, France.)

Fagus
God. Likely associated with the beech tree. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in the Pyrenees in France.)

Gebrinius
God. Possibly a god of travelers or a psychopomp. (Known in Gaul, worship site in Bonn, Germany.)

Glanis
God. Associated with a healing spring. (Known in Gaul, worship site at the ancient city of Glanum in modern Provence, France.)

Gnatus
God. Possibly associated with knowledge. (Known in Gaul, worship site at Etrechy, France.)

Gobannus
God. Likely a god of smiths. (Known in Gaul, worship site near Bern, Switzerland.)

Graius
God. Likely a protective deity. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in the Savoie region of France.)

Grannus
God. Associated with healing springs; in some places associated with the sun. (Known in Gaul and Germania, worship sites in northern Germany and France.)

Hidua
Goddess. Possibly associated with childbirth. (Known in Gaul, worship site at Etrechy, France.)

Ialonus
God. Possibly a river god or a spirit of place. (Known in Gaul and Britain, worship sites at Nimes, France and Lancashire, UK.)

Ianuaria
Goddess. Possibly associated with music and/ or healing. (Known in Gaul, worship site in Burgundy, France.)

Icauna
Goddess. Likely associated with the Yonne River. (Known in Gaul, worship site at Auxerre, France.)

Icovellauna
Goddess. Likely associated with a healing spring. (Known in Gaul, worship site in Metz and Trier in Germany.)

Isosa
Goddess. Name means “respected one.” (Known in Gaul, worship site at Etrechy, France.)

Laha
Goddess. Likely associated with water sources. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in the Pyrenees.)

Latis
Goddess. Possibly associated with water and with strong drink. (Known in Britain, worship Site in Cumbria near Hadrian’s Wall.)

Leherennus
God. Likely a god of strength and protection. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in the Pyrenees.)

Lenus
God. A healing god, likely also a protector of the tribe. (Known in Gaul and Britain, worship sites in Trier and Pommern, Germany and in Caerwent and Chedworth, England.)

Leucetius
God. Consort of Nematona. (Known in Gaul.)

Limetus
God. Likely associated with the elm tree. (Known in Gaul, worship site at Chateauneuf, France.)

Litavis
Goddess. Perhaps a mother goddess. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in Brittany.)

Lugus
God. Associated with animals, and with money. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in France including Montmarte; other sites include Galicia in Spain.)

Magla
Goddess. Associated with leadership, hunting. (Known in Gaul, worship site at Sisek, Croatia.)

Magusanos
God. Associated with fertility, possibly a psychopomp. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in Germany and the Netherlands.)

Maponus
God. Likely associated with youth. May be linked to the Welsh Mabon ap Modron. (Known in Gaul and Britain, worship sites at Bourbonne-les-Bains in France, and at Ribchester, Corbridge and Chesterholm in Britain.)

The Matrae/Matronae
Goddesses. Triad of goddesses associated with family and fertility. (Known in Gaul and Germania, worship sites in northwestern Europe.)

Matunos
God. Very likely a bear god. (Known in Gaul and Britain, worship sites in Roman Britain and in Langres, France.)

Meduna
Goddess. Associated with mead, likely associated with kingship. (Known in Gaul, worship site near Trier, Germany.)

Moccus
God. Possibly associated with boar hunting. (Known in Gaul, worship site at Langres, France and Turin, Italy.)

Mogetius
God. Likely associated with strength and power. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in France and Austria.)

Mogons
God. Associations uncertain, had Gallic and Roman devotees. (Known in Britain and Gaul.)

Moritasgus
God. Likely a healing deity. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in Burgundy, France.)

Mullo
God. Associated with healing, particularly of the eyes. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in Brittany and Normandy.)

Nantosuelta
Goddess. Associated with fertility and prosperity. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in the Alsace-Lorraine region.)

Naria
Goddess. Probably associated with fertility and, perhaps, good fortune. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in Switzerland.)

Nassania
Goddess. Likely associated with a river or spring. (Known in Gaul, worship site in Nassogne, Belgium.)

Nemausus
God. Associated with a healing spring, god of the city. (Known in Gaul, worship sites around Nimes, France.)

Nemetona
Goddess. Tribal deity of the Nemetes; may be associated with sacred places. (Known in Gaul and Britain, worship sites in Bath, England and Trier, Germany, among others.)

Nerius
God. Associated with a healing spring.(Known in Gaul, worship sites in France.)

Nodens
God. Possibly associated with the sea and with hunting. (Known in Britain and possibly Gaul, worship sites in Gloustershire, England and perhaps Mainz, Germany.)

Noreia
Goddess. Likely a protective deity. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in northern Gaul including what is now the Austrian Alps.)

Ocelus
God. Likely associated with battle and/or protection. (Known in Wales, worship sites in Carlisle and Caerwent.)

Ogmios
God. Associated with eloquence and the underworld. (Known in Gaul.)

Olloudius
God. Likely associated with multiple blessings. (Known in Gaul and Britain, worship sites range from Gloucestershire in England to southern Gaul.)

Pyninus
God. Protector of the St. Bernard pass in the Swiss Alps.(Known in Gaul, worshipped at the St. Bernard pass in Switzerland.)

Rigani
Goddess. Likely associated with queenship or sovereignty.(Known in Gaul, worship site at Lezoux, France.)

Ritona
Goddess. Associated with water fords. (Known in Gaul, worship centered in what is now Trier, Germany.)

Robur
God. Likely a god of the oak tree. (Known in Gaul, worship site at Angouleme, France.)

Rosmerta
Goddess. Associated with abundance. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in a wide area including France, Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands.)

Rudianos
God. Likely a battle god. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in France.)

Salacea
Goddess. Associated with the willow tree, likely a water goddess.(Known in Gaul, worship site at Vienna, Austria.)

Satiada
Goddess. Possibly a protective tribal goddess.(Known in Britain, worship site at Chesterholm.)

Segomo
God. Possibly a battle god. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in what is now eastern France.)

Sentona
Goddess. Possibly a goddess of travelers or travel.(Known in Gaul, worship sites in Croatia and Italy.)

Senuna
Goddess. Likely associated with a spring. (Known in Britain, worship site in North Hertfordshire, discovered in 2002.)

Sequana
Goddess. Associated with the Seine and with healing. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in the area of the Seine River.)

Setlocenia
Goddess. Possibly associated with the passing of time, or with great age. (Known in Britain, worship site at Maryport, England.)

Sirona
Goddess. Sometimes consort of Grannus. Associated with healing. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in east and central Gaul and along the Danube limes.)

Smertrios
God. Consort of Ancamna. Likely a provider and protector god. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in Trier, Germany and Notre Dame, France.)

Souconna
Goddess. Associated with the Saone River. (Known in Gaul, worship sites around the Saone River.)

Stanna
Goddess. Sometimes accompanied by Telo. Possibly associated with the home and family. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in Perigueux, France.)

Sucellus
God. Consort of Nantosuelta. Associated with farming, brewing and winemaking. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in the Alsace-Lorraine region; one site in York, England.)

Sulis
Goddess. Associated with healing. (Known in Britain, worship site in Bath, England.)

Taranis
God. Associated with the thunderstorm. Often grouped with Teutates and Esus. (Known in Gaul and Britain, worship sites in Gaul and elsewhere including the Rhine region.)

Tarvos Trigaranos
God. Associated with a bull and three cranes, possibly associated with fertility. (Known in Gaul, worship sites at Notre Dame, Paris, France and Trier, Germany.)

Telo
God. Perhaps a hunting god, or associated with protection. (Known in Gaul, worship site at Perigueux, France.)

Teutates
God. Associated with defense and protection. Often grouped with Esus and Taranis. (Known in Gaul and Britain, worship sites widely ranging through Gaul.)

Ucuetis
God. Associated with smithing and bronzework. Consort of Bergusia. (Known in Gaul, worship site in Alesia, Burgundy.)

Vasio
God. Little is known of this deity. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in the south of France.)

Verbeia
Goddess. Likely a river goddess. (Known in Britain, worship site in Ilkley in Yorkshire.)

Vercana
Goddess. Associations are unclear but may have to do with inspiration and healing. (Known in Gaul, worship sites at Trier and in Ernstweiler, Germany.)

Vesunna
Goddess. Possibly associated with good fortune. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in Cologne, Germany and eastern France.)

Veteris
God. Appears to be a god with many associations including hunting and healing. (Known in Britain, worship sites in Roman Britain, particularly Yorkshire and Durham.)

Visucius
God. Possibly associated with trade. (Known in Gaul, worship sites mainly along the Rhine.)

Vosegus
God. Likely a god of hunting and woodlands. (Known in Gaul, worship sites in France’s Vosges region.)

Categories: About the Gods

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